Rome GA High School | Darlington School

Darlington School
Academics
    

Fine Arts

Kim Tunnell
Fine Arts Department Chairperson


Darlington's Fine Arts Department offers visual art, instrumental and choral music, theater and graphic design. In each of the classes offered in these programs, students have the opportunity to develop creativity and improve thought processes. The arts enhance other academic disciplines and give the brain more ways to process information and, in turn, produce ideas. Our classes support our students as they take risks and develop confidence and self esteem. Fine arts experiences offer a chance to reach outside one’s comfort zone to find what really inspires and motivates. Experiences in music, art, and theater can forever change your life as you experience something bigger than what you ever thought possible. 

All Fine Arts courses receive letter grades.

 

Art 1

You’re the artist! Students learn to apply the principles of art (line, shape, value, texture, and color) by completing a variety of projects – ranging from drawing exercises to printmaking to works in clay.

Skills Developed

  • Basic visual art skills (drawing, painting, printmaking), composition/design
  • Material management (proper  care and safe use of tools and materials)
  • Artistic process (developing ideas  to produce artwork using a variety of media, tools, and processes)
  • Critical analysis/aesthetic understanding

Knowledge Developed

  • Identification and use of the elements of art/principles of organization
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the creation  of artwork
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the critique of artwork

 

Art 2

Students develop their artistic voice while they learn to apply the principles of art (line, shape, value, texture, and color) by completing a variety of projects – ranging from drawing exercises to printmaking to works in clay.  As the year progresses, students move away from tightly controlled projects to more personal projects that reflect their interests and needs.

Skills Developed

  • Improvement of visual art skills (drawing, painting, printmaking), composition/design
  • Material management (proper  care and safe use of tools and materials)
  • Artistic process (developing ideas  to produce artwork using a variety of media, tools, and processes)
  • Critical analysis/aesthetic understanding
     

Knowledge Developed

  • Identification and use of the elements of art/principles of organization
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the creation  of artwork
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the critique of artwork
  • Development of artistic voice
 
Required Prerequisites

Art 1 or approval of instructor (portfolio review)

 

Art 3

Students develop their artistic voice while they learn to apply the principles of art (line, shape, value, texture, and color) by completing a variety of increasingly more demanding projects – ranging from drawing exercises to printmaking to works in clay progresses, While still improving basic skills, students take the initiative to develop independent projects that reflect their interests and needs.

Skills Developed

  • Improvement of visual art skills (drawing, painting, printmaking), composition/design
  • Material management (proper  care and safe use of tools and materials)
  • Artistic process (developing ideas to produce artwork using a variety of media, tools, and processes)
  • Critical analysis/aesthetic understanding
     

Knowledge Developed

  • Identification and use of the elements of art/principles of organization
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the creation  of artwork
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the critique of artwork
  • Development of artistic voice
Required Prerequisites

Art 1, Art 2, or approval of instruction (portfolio review)


Art 4

Students continue to develop their artistic voice while they learn to apply the principles of art (line, shape, value, texture, and color) by completing a variety of increasingly more demanding projects – ranging from drawing exercises to printmaking to works in clay progresses, While still improving basic skills, students take the initiative to develop independent projects that reflect their interests and needs with the ultimate goal of producing portfolio quality work.

Skills Developed

  • Improvement of visual art skills (drawing, painting, printmaking), composition/design
  • Material management (proper  care and safe use of tools and materials)
  • Artistic process (developing ideas  to produce artwork using a variety of media, tools, and processes)
  • Critical analysis/aesthetic understanding
     

Knowledge Developed

  • Identification and use of the elements of art/principles of organization
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the creation  of artwork
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the critique of artwork
  • Development of artistic voice
Required Prerequisites
Art 1, 2, 3, or approval of instructor (portfolio review)

 

AP Studio Art

The AP program is for serious seniors who have demonstrated excellence, self-motivation, and dedication in studio art.  Portfolio guidelines, established by The College Board's AP Program, require the submission of a minimum of 27 works demonstrating Breadth (12 works), Concentration (10-12 works), and Quality (five works). Students interested in this class will experience college-level learning and the inherent demands of that learning level.

Skills Developed

  • Outstanding visual art skills (drawing, painting, printmaking), composition/design
  • Material management (proper  care and safe use of tools and materials)
  • Artistic process (developing ideas  to produce artwork using a variety of media, tools, and processes)
  • Critical analysis/aesthetic understanding
     

Knowledge Developed

  • Identification and use of the elements of art/principles of organization
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the creation  of artwork
  • Use of appropriate vocabulary during the critique of artwork
  • Development of artistic voice
Required Prerequisites
Approval of instructor (portfolio submission)
Completed AP Application

 

Cinema

Cinema is a great chance to learn more about the greatest directors and films in the American canon. Seniors and juniors have top priority.  If you like movies, this class is for you! It offers the opportunity to take an in-depth look at some of our country’s iconic films, greatest directors, and participate in thought-provoking exploration of the impact and culture of modern movie-making. Through the study of directors’ aesthetics and viewing of films, you will explore how film both reflects and contributes to our cultural trends and exists as a significant art form.

Skills Developed
 
  • Students learn interpretative methods
  • Students develop awareness of film aesthetics
  • Students learn to interpret, make connections, ask questions and make inferences by thinking critically

Knowledge Developed

  • The significance of film as an aesthetic entity.
  • The relevance of the director’s style and philosophy in film product.
  • The varying approaches to film as art as seen through exploration of directorial style.
  • The ability to pinpoint perspective, style and nuance in great films and what makes them great.
  • Literary values incorporated in film (theme, plot, character, etc)

Special Notes

Viewing permission of G, PG, PG-13, and R-rated films

 
 
Art History - Minimum enrollment required

Art History spans the history and cultural influence of art throughout the world in chronological order beginning with cave paintings and ending with art beyond abstract expressionism. We encourage our students to explore the meanings and connections of art and what they reveal about their original cultures and to us today. We also try to understand the relationships between cultures across the world as well as independent reports, and they also give oral/visual presentations on vital topics. All of these projects are graded and re-graded.

Skills Developed

  • Lecture and note-taking
  • Research and writing
  • Compare and contrast
  • Discussion of how art changes over time
  • Recognition and connection of art in different settings
  • Placing major works of art in proper time period and region

Knowledge Developed

  • Understanding of art and culture from earliest societies to modern day
  • Understanding of the role of the artist and patron in the history of the world
  • Understanding of production of different art forms
  • Recognition of major artists and their works
 

Ladies' Chorale
 

Have you always wanted to learn how to sing well? Or do you simply enjoy music and being with other people? For all these, and many other reasons, the Ladies' Chorale is your place to learn the basics of how to sing, read, and appreciate vocal music. Through daily rehearsals and a wide variety of musical styles, students will learn about healthy vocal production, musicianship and sight-reading, as well as gain the skills necessary for ensemble singing.

Skills Developed

  • Produce proper vocal tone appropriate to various styles of music
  • Demonstrate ability to sing accurately in 1, 2 and 3 parts
  • Communicate expressively through dynamic contrast, vocal tone, facial expression and body language.
  • Identify and solve issues of balance, blend, and ensemble
  • React appropriately to a conducting gesture
  • Read music (both pitch and rhythm) from a printed score

Knowledge Developed

  • An understanding of the fundamentals of musical notation, including pitches and note values, key and time signatures, and musical terms
  • A vocabulary to describe the standards of vocal/choral excellence
  • Knowledge of the musical, literary, historic, cultural, and/or religious context of chosen repertoire

Men's Chorale

Have you always wanted to learn how to sing well? Or do you simply enjoy music and being with other people? For all these, and many other reasons, the Men's Chorale is your place to learn the basics of how to sing, read, and appreciate music. Through daily rehearsals and a wide variety of musical styles, students will learn about healthy vocal production, musicianship skills and sight-reading, as well as the skills necessary for ensemble singing.

Skills Developed

  • Produce proper vocal tone appropriate to various styles of music
  • Demonstrate ability to sing accurately in 1, 2 and 3 parts
  • Communicate expressively through dynamic contrast, vocal tone, facial expression and body language
  • Identify and solve issues of balance, blend, and ensemble
  • React appropriately to a conducting gesture
  • Read music (both pitch and rhythm) from a printed score

Knowledge Developed

  • An understanding of the fundamentals of musical notation, including pitches and note values, key and time signatures, and musical terms
  • A vocabulary to describe the standards of vocal/choral excellence
  • Knowledge of the musical, literary, historic, cultural, and/or religious context of chosen repertoire

 

Concert Choir

For the motivated and experienced choral singer, Concert Choir is a mixed ensemble for those students who are proficient with vocal technique and musicianship and wish to develop those skills to a mastery level. In addition to presenting three to four concerts throughout the year, the choir performs at various school functions, and represents Darlington at various civic and school-related events on and off-campus, including a choir tour during the spring semester. A successful Concert Choir member is dedicated and invested.

Skills Developed

  • Demonstrate ability to sing accurately in parts
  • Produce vocal tone appropriate to various styles of music
  • Communicate expressively through dynamic contrast, vocal tone, facial expression, and body language
  • Identify and solve issues of balance, blend, and ensemble
  • React appropriately to a conducting gesture
  • Read music (both pitch and rhythm) from a printed score
Knowledge Developed
 
  • An understanding of the fundamentals of musical notation, including pitches and note values, key and time signatures, and musical terms
  • A vocabulary to describe the standards of vocal/choral excellence
  • Knowledge of the musical, literary, historic, cultural, and/or religious context of chosen repertoire
 
Required Prerequisites

At least one year of prior choral experience is strongly encouraged.

Membership is based on auditions held in the spring for the following year (and in the first week of school for new students).  Auditions are comprised of a student's demonstration of music reading ability, intonation, and musicality.


AP Music Theory 

Why did the composer choose to write the melody this way? Why does this chord tug at my heartstrings so strongly? And why does this piece just seem strange?AP Music Theory develops a student’s ability to recognize, understand and describe the basic processes and materials of music as they are heard or presented in a musical score. Students will use listening, singing, and written exercises to develop aural, analytical, and composition skills.

Skills Developed

  • Write and analyze music following common practice techniques in contrapuntal techniques, voice leading, chord progressions and figured bass.
  • Identify and recite intervals, chords and scales both aurally and on paper.
  • Identify and recite melody, harmony, and rhythm both aurally and on paper through sight-reading and dictation.

Knowledge Developed

  • Basic pitch and rhythm notation
  • Tonality -- major, minor
  • Scales -- major, minor, modal, pentatonic, whole tone
  • Intervals and transposition
  • Introduction to melodic organization and counterpoint
  • Triads and seventh chords
  • Roman numeral analysis and figured bass Symbols
  • Part writing
  • Cadences
  • Harmonic progression
  • Texture/form
  • Non-harmonic tones/motivic treatment
  • Secondary dominants/tonicization
  • Modulation to closely related keys
  • Introduction to extended harmony

Required Prerequisites

  • Teacher recommendation along with theory level placement test
  • Ability to read music
  • Performance ability on an instrument or in voice
 

Beginning Instrumental Methods

The Instrumental Methods course is designed for a beginning instrumentalist who wishes to learn an instrument or one day become part of either the Orchestra or Band. In class, students learn to read music and perform independently and with an ensemble. Each student will ultimately be able to transfer the skill acquired in class into a deeper appreciation for instrumental music or towards successful participation in an ensemble class the following year.  All aspiring band (including guitar) and orchestral instrumentalists welcome. Private lessons outside of class are strongly recommended as a supplement to the in class experience.

 

Wind Ensemble

At the Upper School, students will find that the Wind Ensemble is extremely versatile. This award-winning group plays music from the standard concert and symphonic repertoire. The Wind Ensemble offers every student the opportunity to build proficiency beyond his or her current skill level.

Skills Developed

  • Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music
  • Reading and notating music
  • Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments
  • Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines
  • Rhythm reading proficiency

Knowledge Developed

  • Listening to, analyzing, and describing music
  • Evaluating music and music performances
  • Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts
  • Understanding music in relation to history and culture
  • Appreciation of music of multiple styles and genres
Required Prerequisites
  • Suggested previous ability on instrument
  • Ability to read music

Special Notes

  • Stadium Band is required for all participants (excluding special circumstances).
  • Spring competitive festival is required (excluding special circumstances).
  • Each participant is required to provide proper concert attire (black tuxedo for gentlemen and black floor-length gown for ladies).
 

Orchestra

Do you play a stringed instrument? Orchestra is for all string players and the class accommodates all skill levels by allowing participation in the String Ensemble without audition. Repertoire covers the major symphonic styles. The Orchestra offers every student the opportunity to build proficiency beyond his or her current skill level.

Skills Developed

  • Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music
  • Reading and notating music
  • Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments
  • Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines
  • Rhythm reading proficiency

Knowledge Developed

  • Listening to, analyzing, and describing music
  • Evaluating music and music performances
  • Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts
  • Understanding music in relation to history and culture
  • Appreciation of music of multiple styles and genres

Required Prerequisites

  • Suggested previous ability on instrument
  • Ability to read music

Special Notes

  • Spring competitive festival is required (excluding special circumstances).
  • Each participant is required to provide proper concert attire (black tuxedo for gentlemen and black floor-length gown for ladies).
  • Orchestra members are encouraged to audition for the string quartet. 

 

Theatre Performance

Calling all beginning actors! If you would like to learn the basic skills needed to act or just become more comfortable on the stage or in front of a group, this class is for you. Through a wide range of experiences, you will learn basic theater vocabulary, stage directions, theater etiquette, and increase your ability and confidence to act and speak in any situation.  

Skills Developed

  • Recognition of stage directions
  • Character analysis
  • Recognition of theater vocabulary
  • Basic acting skills

Knowledge Developed

  • Basic principles of acting
  • Basic stage and rehearsal terms
  • Theatre etiquette
  • Audition process

 

StageCraft 

This course is an opportunity for students to explore themselves in art and art in themselves. Through class projects, building, designing and rigging for school productions, students will gain the confidence and technique needed to become skilled theatre technicians. Students will develop an appreciation for the technical artist's contribution to the total aesthetic effect of a dramatic production. The course will provide for the development and growth of the students’ artistic perspective and hands-on skill. Student technicians will learn to interpret and execute a theatrical designer's plans, much like an actor learns how to interpret and execute a playwright's script. Topics covered through diverse project-based curriculum will also include painting and set construction techniques; equipment use and maintenance; principles and application of sound and lighting technology; design and construction of theatrical props: the use of special effects; costume and makeup design; and the function of technical stage personnel in production work. Technical theatre will incorporate academic study and hands-on application of knowledge and skills. All work is in-class and does not require an after school commitment. 

Skills Developed

  • Students will learn to think critically as a set, prop, costume, light and sound builder and solve problems they encounter.
  • Students will become proficient in the use of various technical theatre tools and the understanding of the technical terms.
  • Students will understand the different types of positions in theatre and each person's job.
  • Students will demonstrate the successful construction, design and rigging of various technical aspects of productions for public performance.

Knowledge Developed

  • Set design and construction
  • Prop design and construction
  • Costume and makeup design and construction
  • Tool use and safety
  • Light design and rigging
  • Basic sound design and rigging
  • Technical theatre professions and aesthetic contributions

 

Introduction to Media Arts 

This class introduces students to the exciting world of print and online media. Law, ethics, and the history of journalism will complement the major units of study: reporting, writing, editing, photography, advertising, graphic design, management and teamwork. In addition, students will use Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator to produce media published in campus student publications.

Will vary by student, but will include:

  • Writing for Darlingtonian.com
  • Graphic Design
  • Current Event Discussion
  • Advertising Creation

 

Advanced Media: Yearbook I, II, III

In this course, students will produce the Jabberwokk, Darlington’s annual yearbook. Course fundamentals include basic news writing, reporting, editing, and photography. Students will write news stories and take photos that will be published in the yearbook and when appropriate, the Darlingtonian.com. Using Adobe InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrators, students will develop advanced graphic design skills in the creation of the yearbook. Students will assume editorial roles and work in teams to meet publication deadlines.

  • Writing, editing, interviewing, showing mastery of AP Style
  • Photojournalism
  • Advanced layout and graphic design
  • Marketing and advertising
  • Leadership

 

The Newsroom I/II/III 

Students will create multimedia news, feature, entertainment and sports stories for The Darlingtonian and for TheDarNews social media platforms. This is an active publishing class run like a newsroom. Editors will lead the class in news pitch sessions where weekly plans for creating fresh and relevant content expressing the news and opinions of the student body will be determined. Students will determine the best format for telling the stories -- video, written, or a combination of the two depending on the subject. Students will be taught the foundations of AP Style, interviewing and broadcast techniques. Students will use Wordpress, Adobe Premiere Pro, and mobile apps to produce media published on the Darlingtonian.com.

Knowledge & Skill Set

  • Writing 
  • Social Media Strategy & Competence
  • Wordpress
  • Video Editing: Adobe Premiere Pro
  • Editorial Decision Making & Leadership
  • AP Style
  • Law & Ethics

 

Design Thinking

Design thinking is a method of applying creativity to come up with novel solutions to real world problems and concerns. The process involves empathizing with a user, defining a problem, brainstorming through ideation, developing prototypes, and testing solutions. In the Innovation and Design Thinking course, teams will build solutions for problems in our community and world. Skills in fine arts, business, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) will be valuable to this collaborative process . Training with creative technologies found in the Darlington MakerSpace, such as 3D printing, vinyl cutting, laser cutting, and the use of woodworking tools, will be provided.

Required Prerequisites

Instructor permission. This course can be taken any year as an elective class.

 


    

    

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